Finding God: Students can intimately encounter God in small acts of kindness

As college students, it can be difficult to find the time to have a healthy spiritual life.
For those seeking an intimate relationship with God, it can seem like a daunting task.
While there are benefits to being in a church or engaging in sacramental rituals, I believe it is also important to be able to see God in the everyday moments.
Being on a small campus, it is difficult for any student to walk to class without seeing a familiar face.
A gentle smile, a little compliment or a quick handshake can make a meaningful impact on another person.
The ability to spread love through these seemingly mundane routines is one of the greatest habits to form to incorporate a greater sense of spirituality into one’s life.
Nearly every time anyone enters the Beyer Hall cafeteria, they are greeted by one of many Metz workers.
Whether it is a simple conversation or encouragement for the day, it is important to recognize that while the act is simple, it is not small.
How many times do we have the opportunity to talk with another person, but instead try to make the interaction as quick as possible?
The students, staff and faculty members on campus take extra steps to brighten the days of other individuals.
The goal of every Gannon student is to graduate with a degree meaningful to them.
After graduation, there are endless options for where life could take every one of us.
Wherever you end up, who will be the people you interact with on a daily basis?
Will you be able to see them as a human being with dignity and worth?
Will the people around you intentionally avoid eye contact?
It’s important to remember that being a Gannon student is not a permanent state.
Life at Gannon is special; by starting to practice appreciating the simple moments now in such a hospitable environment, students will be better equipped to make a meaningful impact in their future routines.
When I look back on my time at Gannon, what I’ll remember most are the smiles I had on AJ’s Way, the obnoxious laughing I did in the cafeteria and the heartfelt conversations I had in the residence halls.
The little moments matter. We may never know the full impact a small comment or simple conversation could have on an individual.
We may never see the fruit of our work, but that does not make it any less meaningful.
We must be able to see God in the small moments every day.
In doing so, we start to form a deeper and more meaningful relationship with him.

JUSTIN JOHNSON
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