‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ brings back memories

Over the weekend I went to see “To Kill a Mockingbird” with my friend Chris. We only went because our Drama class requires us to see two plays and write reviews on them. Neither of us are “play goers,” so I found this a really good experience.

I haven’t been to many plays in the last few years. The last one I remember going to is “Hairspray,” and that was years ago.

Going over the weekend reminded me how I actually like seeing plays. I have a respect for people who can get up on stage and act out a performance. I would never have the guts to do it.

Mayella Ewell left a lasting impression on me. Amy Gilewicz did an amazing job acting her out. For anyone who has seen the movie, you know how her character is. Mayella is a shy, kind of awkward and obviously an abused character.

When she starts shouting in the courtroom, it is shocking. Gilewicz portrayed this extremely well.  When she started shouting, it actually shocked me. I knew it was coming but her character was so quick to awaken that it was impossible to not jump.

I don’t know how actors do it. I think my stage fright would get the best of me.

When I was in fifth grade, I was in a play called “The Emperor’s New Clothes” and I was the Minister of Style, I think. This was so long ago, but I have a very vivid memory of the curtain going up.

We were all standing on the stage together, getting ready for the first song. The curtain was up and the audience was all staring at us. When the music started, the chorus started to sing, but I didn’t.

My mind went blank. I could not think of any words. I remember turning to the person next to me and asking what my lines were. I had completely forgotten everything I was supposed to say and I was supposed to talk at the end of the song but I couldn’t remember the lines.

As much as I would like to share a hysterical story of me not remember my lines and embarrassing myself dramatically, I am proud to say that didn’t happen. My lines came back to me once I calmed down. I delivered them as all as any nervous fifth grader could have.

Even though I finished the play without passing out or embarrassing myself, I didn’t want to act after that. I never tried out for another play. I rarely went to see them. However, I have a respect for actors and actresses.

I could never do what they do. I was reminded of this over the weekend.

 

KAT SHINDLEDECKER

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