Voters should cast ballots with informed background

Before you make a choice that could affect millions of other people, you should do your research.

Americans across the nation went to vote on Tuesday for the candidate they thought would best fit each designated office.

As a result, my Facebook newsfeed exploded with people saying they voted and encouraging others absentmindedly scrolling the Web to go out and vote.

Voting is a privilege our country has that some other nations do not, and I appreciate the right I have to make my voice heard.

While I do not discourage others from going out there and voting, I want those who do vote to be able to make an educated decision.

It’s a bit late for this year’s elections, but the next time there’s an election, if you’re going to go out there and let your voice be heard, please make sure you know everything about each candidate you vote for.

One of my friends posted a graphic saying “bad people get into office because people don’t vote.”

While some choosing to abstain from voting might be part of the cause, another one is when people who do vote don’t know much about who they’re voting for.

I know plenty of people do everything they can to find out who all of the candidates are, where they stand on the issues, etc., but I’m also positive not everyone does this, whether it’s because they don’t have time or they just don’t care.

Each of the leaders we elect, whether it’s a local mayor or the president of the United States, will affect our lives, whether we realize it or not.

We need to be conscious of what these officials aim to do if they get elected into office.

Everyone has their own opinions on politics and what elected officials should be doing. The way our country works is that we vote for people who have mostly the same viewpoints that we do so they can try to accomplish the things we want to get done.

That can’t happen if voters don’t do their research so they know who they’re voting for.

It also can’t happen if people don’t vote.

A couple of years ago, when I first was able to vote, a couple of categories popped up and I had no idea who most of the people were. I chose to abstain because I didn’t want to be the reason somebody I didn’t like got elected.

You may say that one person’s ballot may not make much of a difference, but if hundreds of Americans have the mentality that it doesn’t matter who they vote for because they’re just one person, then it makes a difference.

Like I said earlier, I’m not trying to tell anyone that they shouldn’t vote. I think everyone should. But I think everyone should know who they’re voting for when they go to the polls.

If you haven’t already registered to vote, please do so before the next election and study up on who’s running for office.

 

KHADIJA DJELLOULI

[email protected]