Unusual spring break trip proves relevant, senior travels to Boston to research future opportunities

Spring break is the time of the school year when most people go south for a week of fun in the sun away from school work. I, however, will go in the opposite direction and actually spend my break at school.

My friend Nickie attends Boston College, and ever since freshman year, we decided that I would come up and visit her. Well, four years and a $100 plane ticket later, that plan will become reality.

While I visit her, I plan to tour the campus of Boston College and maybe even attend one or two of her classes. I know, I know. Attend class while on break? What am I thinking? I think it might be neat to compare Gannon University to Boston College.

I will also get a chance to see what it is like to attend a Division I school as opposed to Division II. Also, the campus is outside of the city instead of being mixed in with it, so it will be fun to see what that situation is like as well.

But my trip is not just for touring a school and visiting a good friend; it is so much more. I, of course, will go into the city and do some fun, tourist-y things. Nickie said that she has a bunch of fun things planned for us to do since her campus is only 10 minutes away from downtown. But while I am there, I also look forward to some job searching.

As a senior getting ready to graduate, I view this summer differently. Hopefully, I’ll  find a job that can jumpstart me into making it into the career world.

While in Boston, I would like to see what is available. I will start looking at what can be found on the campus of BC and then move into what is available in the city.

Boston is not the only place I will look. Once I get home, I will search for jobs in State College, Erie, Buffalo and Pittsburgh.

Even though this sounds like a lot of work, we do have a whole week off school. I would hope that my fellow seniors, traveling or not, will do the same.

Take time to really look for something. No matter what your major, May will come faster than you think.

It’s already the end of February, and it seems like yesterday we were just moving back into Gannon as freshmen. Juniors, don’t wait; it is never too late to start planning your future.

Here are some ideas to get you started. Try to pick a location where you would want to work in, then job search there. Start with legitimate sources.

While Craigslist can be helpful, do not make that your only job search. If you are stuck, a lot of professors have websites and journals that are readily available; do not be afraid to ask.

If staying locally, either in your hometown or in Erie, look at the classified sections of the newspaper. I know that seems so old school, but honestly, it will help.

Also, do some networking, sort of like how I am. If you know somebody, see how they can help you. Ask family members, professors, friends and neighbors – people who are close to you are always willing to help you out.

Actually travel to the places you are considering moving to. I am traveling to Boston; I have a couple of friends who are going to D.C. While we are going on a vacation, we are also taking the time to do some research. I might get to Boston and decide that it is not a place I would want to live, but I would never know if I didn’t visit. Yes, traveling is expensive, but in the end, it is worth it.

Visiting places also goes along with those who are attending graduate school. Even if you are accepted and ready to go, it might be fun to take a trip there anyway. You can map out the territory and get used to the place where you will spend the next year or so.

Also, if you think graduate school could be in your future but would like to wait a bit, look for jobs on college campuses. Look around and see what is available and can be done.

If you are going home and know that you will stay in your hometown post graduation, do not just bank on that. Make sure you have a job lined up. Set up interviews; get your name out there. That way if nothing is available, you are not stuck in a situation you do not want to be in.

So, yes, while I will attend a BC hockey game, tour Little Italy, go on a search for the Cheers bar and take an obscene amount of pictures with the Doug Flutie statue, I will also be on the lookout for what could be a future employment opportunity.

 I suggest that others do the same. Remember one thing – your first job is more than likely not going to be permanent, but you have to start somewhere.

CAITIE RYAN

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