‘Potter’ class would be great addition to curriculum

I have a proposition for the faculty and administration of Gannon University. I’d like a class centralized around the “Harry Potter” series.

I’m not saying that this class should be a required course for everybody, I’m just saying that it would be an interesting elective to offer, if not every semester, every once in a while.

Here’s why I think this would be a good idea. The “Harry Potter” franchise consists of seven books, eight movies, a website and a theme park. Not to mention several interviews of J.K. Rowling, the author. There’s plenty of information on the subject.

Plenty of subjects could be based around the world of Harry Potter: literature, history, sociology, science, theology, philosophy; even a business class could discuss the Potter franchise as a whole.

Secondly, plenty of students would definitely be willing to take the class. All of the “Potterheads” at Gannon – and I’m sure there are plenty of them – would definitely have an interest if Gannon offered a class about “Harry Potter.”

I feel as though professors would enjoy teaching the classes too. If the students have an interest in “Harry Potter,” then attendance will rise, as well as attentiveness and alertness in the classroom.

Most students would love this class and class discussions, essays and homework would be a lot more interesting.  A class like this could be an enlightening experience for both the student and the professor.

A “Harry Potter” class could also potentially add to enrollment rates. Think about it. The class would set us apart from several other colleges and universities and it would definitely be an incentive to choose Gannon over another school a potential student is looking at.

I understand that throwing this topic out into the open is a bit of a bold move on my part, but I really think that students could use “Harry Potter” to educate themselves on a specific topic and enjoy learning in the meantime.

If any faculty member is reading this and likes the “Harry Potter” series or just would like to teach an interesting class sometime in the future, I encourage you to please consider this. If not, recommend it to a colleague who you think could teach a course like this.

If anyone would consider this proposition, I would love to discuss possibilities of such a class, and even if this class couldn’t be offered immediately, Gannon could aim to have this class at a later date.

That is to say, offer the class before I graduate.

If you are a student at Gannon, and you agree with me about this, discuss it with some of the professors. It will get the idea jumping around in their heads and, hopefully, a “Harry Potter” class can be offered at Gannon sometime in the near future.

 

KHADIJA DJELLOULI

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