Simple rules make resolutions possible

Jan 19 • Features • 1138

At the beginning of each new year, many people make resolutions that usually fade by Valentine’s Day.

Dedicated resolution-ites might keep their vows until St. Patrick’s Day or Easter, but by May, resolutions are forgotten completely. However, this year could be different. Here’s a list of the common resolutions and what you can do to make them achievable:

1. Resolution: Go on a healthy diet/eat healthy. While this is a great resolution and can bring about a positive lifestyle, it can be hard to keep without a good mindset. Avoid the latest trendy diet, however, as those can do more harm than good.

Solution: Opt for salads and ready-made sandwiches and cook at home. If your apartment has a kitchen area, try cooking at home every once in a while. Make a roommate or housemate pact to make dinner together once a week or twice a month. It can make for a good time and beats going out to eat. You’ll save money and calories.

Some college students have already thought outside the box in terms of their resolutions for the new year. Freshman  education major Jenn Wendling made a new year’s resolution worth taking up.

“My resolution is to live my life and stop worrying about what other people think of me,” she said.

Another common resolution that students make is to work on their fitness.

2. Resolution: Go to the gym/work out more.

Solution: Find time to work out at home. As much of a good thought as it is, finding the time or motivation to go to the gym sometimes doesn’t happen, especially after a long day of classes and meetings.

 Workout videos are available on the Internet or on Netflix. Also, use the Wii or Kinect for Xbox if you have access to either of them. The actual process of hitting the gym can be more motivating if you go with someone else. 

Push each other and set goals to break; it can make your friendship – and your muscles –stronger.

Jamie Gionfriddo, a senior biology major, has decided to give up something on the first of every month.

“I have the list sitting on my desk,” she said. “I gave up pop in January, in the hopes of eating healthier.”

3. Resolution: Get into a relationship/go on a date.

Solution: Stay single and willing to mingle. Being single isn’t such a bad thing. This year, instead of worrying about finding “the one,” make the relationships you already have stronger. Spend more time with friends and call home more. 

Do something out of the box by joining a new club or activity. Consider meeting new people or spend more time with other students in your major. Who knows, that special someone might come along. However, if that’s not the case, your life will still be more fulfilled.

Brandon Wiley, a graduate student and resident campus minister, has a resolution that many people could use.

“My resolution is to actually keep my New Year’s resolution,” he said.

4. Resolution: Quit smoking/drinking so much.

Solution: Find alternatives to going to the bar. Go ice skating, see a sporting event or a movie or go to the mall. If spending money isn’t an option, play in the snow, have a movie night or invite people over for a game night. As for smoking, if it’s a pack a day, try to narrow it down to a pack a week. If it’s a pack a week, try a pack a month.

Whether your resolution is to change your lifestyle or to live out a healthier one, there are ways you can fit it into a college schedule.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help or see if someone wants to join you in your goal. Doing it alone gives you the excuse to quit; having someone keeping you in check pushes you to keep going.

Either way, good luck with whatever resolutions you may have made. You never know – they could make it past Easter this year.

CAITIE RYAN

ryan014@gannon.edu

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