We must stop demanding free entertainment

Oct 25 • Opinion • 355

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutubeby feather

If anyone is an avid watcher of YouTube, you are most likely aware of the recent Shane Dawson docu-series featuring one of the site’s most hated creators, Jake Paul.

This series of eight videos showcased interviews from individuals who had their own stories to tell about Paul.

The interviews that Dawson conducted created a nonbiased portrayal of how certain situations took place throughout the career of Paul, including rather questionable antics.

The total series ran for over six hours, which means that Dawson and his cameraman-turned-editor, Andrew Siwicki, worked on editing the long series by themselves for days on end.

What is interesting about the way this series was produced was that Dawson listened to criticism regarding the series and then worked to re-edit the upcoming episodes to cater to the audience.

This put a lot more work on Dawson and Siwicki, as they thought it would ultimately be best to re-edit the hard work they already did in order to keep the audience happy.

The thing that really struck me was the fact that, while the editing was taking place, viewers were sending messages out through Twitter about how they were disappointed by the upload schedule and the time it was taking the pair to produce the series.

These kinds of comments really upset me for a few reasons.

The main reason these comments upset me was because Dawson puts out his content on a free platform.

YouTube is a way for content creators to use their creativity to produce things that they can show to their audience free of cost.

I think it is important to keep this in mind when it comes to talking about creators on platforms such as YouTube.

These creators could be posting on other platforms that would require the audience to pay for the content that they are consuming.

For example, some creators from YouTube are now creating things for YouTube Red, which does require the consumer to pay a monthly fee in order to watch the videos posted to the platform.

Other individuals decide to post their more exclusive content to their Patreon pages, which requires donations from consumers in order to access the special videos.

Most YouTube creators, though, do not find it necessary to hide their content behind a wall of fees.

I can only imagine that they do this because they care about the people they are making the content for.

These creators could choose to charge for their content, but they decide not to, so we should not attack them when we do not agree with something they are doing or not doing.

I find that people now demand free content much more than ever before.

Because of all the work that is put in to creating the free content that we are consuming, I think we need to be much more patient with the creators behind the art.

The situation with Dawson is the perfect example of how people need to learn to be more patient with content creators who choose to put out their art on free platforms for us to enjoy.

Overall, we need to appreciate the hard work more.

HARLEE BOEHM

boehm003@knights.gannon.edu

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Comments

comments

Related Posts

0 comments

« »