Issue9_Features_Sophia

Saudi Crown Prince announces Neom

Nov 7 • Features • 161

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Saudi pioneers have comprehended for a considerable length of time that their nation’s economy must change. Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman, who has planned for the vision of 2030 of Saudi Arabia, recently made an announcement about the future city that is going to be built in the Red Sea, which called Neom.
The real meaning of Neom is the “new future” – a blend of “neo,” or new, and an inference from the Arabic word “Mustaqbal,” or future. This city is a part of this Vision 2030 plan, which will extend beyond the kingdom of Saudi Arabia to include parts of Egypt and Jordan.
Neom is a one-of-a-kind modern zone that will traverse three nations: Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt. It will be neighboring the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba and close sea exchange courses that utilize the Suez Canal.
The Saudi government, the kingdom’s Public Investment Fund and neighborhood and global financial specialists are relied upon to put the greater part of $500 trillion into the zone in coming years, Crown Prince Mohammed said. Neom’s cutting edge world envision tedious assignments being outsourced to robots or completely mechanized.
There will be a new lifestyle that the world has never seen. For instance, new transportation, new building designs and new communication technology that no one has ever known about. Solar energy will be the first source of energy in this city.
Neom is not a normal city, but it’s the city of dreams. In the conference, Crown Prince Mohammed said the difference between the normal city and Neom is like the difference between an old generation of cell phones and smart phones.
Crown Prince Mohammed gave the citizenship of Saudi Arabia to the robot called “Sophia.”
Robot Sophia became a Saudi citizen after this conference, and Saudi Arabia became the first country to give citizenship to robot. Today, we must work together to build the future for our next generations. The next generation will ask, “What we have given to them?”

KHALED ALLWIMI
allwimi001@knights.gannon.edu

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