How you should approach tattoos if for, against them

Apr 22 • News • 2002

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The craze to get a tattoo done isn’t exactly a new phenomenon, but it has become more popular as the years go by.

Even though it’s not a new trend, it remains moderately controversial, depending on who you’re around. Most people are either entirely against getting tattoos or they don’t care either way. One of the most common things you’ll hear from people who oppose tattoos is, “What’s that going to look like when you’re old?”

Well, thanks to Buzzfeed, we finally have an answer to that question. The video titled “How do Tattoos Change over 50 Years” shows that even after decades of aging, tattoos still look “awesome.”

Now tattoos are a very personal thing, and I don’t think it’s right to persuade people to get a tattoo if they absolutely don’t want one. But it’s not fair to automatically judge other people who like tattoos and get them, just because you don’t like them.

Unless they have something misspelled. Then judge away.

I don’t have a tattoo, mostly because I have commitment issues and a low tolerance of pain. However, I’m not against them. I think what people want to tattoo on their body is their own business.

If you do want to get a tattoo, there are probably a couple of things you should accept.

There’s a good chance you’re probably going to get a bunch of annoying questions if you decide to show people. If you’d like to avoid these questions, you should probably get it in a place you can cover it up.

Some people will have something to say about it, whether or not you want to hear it. This can include parents, grandparents and random people who think you care.

One of the most annoying things I’ve heard is about people who think tattoos that are stereotypically girly “aren’t real tattoos.” To that I say: if a girl wants to get a tattoo of butterflies flying in the shape of an infinity symbol out of a dream catcher, that’s her own business. It’s her body, and that is just as much of a tattoo as the tribal skulls that some people have.

Everyone has an opinion. If you don’t want to hear all of these opinions, I recommend covering any tattoos you may have.

Also, if you plan on starting a career in the professional world you should get a tattoo where you can cover it up. Unless you are in a field for a while and you know that it’s not a huge deal, then you can be a bit more liberal. Still I wouldn’t go nuts and start on any sleeves unless you’re 1000 percent sure that it’s OK.

Some employers are becoming more accepting of tattoos and piercing, but others want their employees to dress conservatively. Be cautious.

All in all, if you don’t like how tattoos look, then don’t get them and try not to be judgmental of others who have them if you have no reason to be. If you do like tattoos and want to get them, just be mindful of the professionalism of your field.

 

KHADIJA DJELLOULI

djelloul001@knights.gannon.edu

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